Did I mention we were having a Labor Day sale at Ebooks Direct this weekend?

dduane:

image

We are. 50% off everything. No discount codes to deal with… the store has handled the markdowns by itself. (It’s clever that way.)

Do feel free to reblog this and spread the news around if you like. (Especially since it’ll make me feel a little better. I have, would you believe it, an infected toe* which is saddening me somewhat.)

*Sorry for the possible TMI. At least you don’t have to walk on it. Ow.

(via lizzieraindrops)

theanimationarchive:

I don’t even have to tell you why this is important or why you should support the Kickstarter to bring back Reading Rainbow; you know why. So go do it!

(via unprofessionalamber)

So I have quite a few 2013 books still to post… Here we go! (Spoilers below) 39 / 50 Books in 2013
Woooo, Percy returns! I still like the third-person POV, but I honestly laughed with delight when I realised how consistently Percy’s voice is portrayed even from an external narrator. Well done, Rick Riordan :)
So broad strokes: Hazel and Frank are A++. I want to hug them. I want to hug everybody. Frank’s grandmother is the complete greatest, that is all. I thought Riordan did a fabulous job illustrating the differences between Greek and Roman society, and I deeply appreciated the presence of Italic deities and those with no Greek counterparts. (Terminus the TSA agent. Bless him.)
Mars and his differences from Ares were wonderful, and I’m glad they brought him to the forefront. Interestingly, the supreme power of Mars combined with the Romans’ distrust of Neptune almost makes Frank more powerful than Percy to the Romans, especially once you take into account that he is a descendent of Neptune as well. How very interesting.
I was also fascinated by the explanation of New Rome in the west and the Greeks in the east, especially the bit about the Eastern and Western Roman empires, the Byzantines… I’m just floored by the ways Riordan adapts these concepts. “That’s why,” he explains through Frank in Chapter 9, “whatever country we settle in, Camp Jupiter is always in the west—the Roman part of the territory. The east is considered bad luck.”
Funny things… Dakota and his Kool-Aid were hilarious, though not nearly as much as Iris and the Rainbow Organic Foods & Lifestyles Co-op (full of ROFLcopters). That is how you write to your audience. Also when Mars wrote the prophecy for the quest and silently threatened Octavian with a grenade. That was hilarious and also something Octavian totally deserved.
The Twelfth Legion Fulminata is fantastic all around, and hooray for Fulminata being an accurate adjective there! Other linguistic-y things and more about Octavian and Ella (Ella and Tyson—be still my heart. Cuter than cute.) will follow at the end, under the cut ^_^
Finally, before that, I have forever and eternal emotions about Percy’s desire for a future with Annabeth at New Rome, which ties in beautifully to the last line, which was so touching: “‘Come on,’ he said. ‘Let me introduce you to my other family.’”
[[MORE]]
So, speaking of Octavian, he was a fabulous character. I have to quote this whole bit from Chapter 13:

Suddenly Percy understood what an effective speaker Octavian was. He sounded reasonable and supportive, but his expression was pained. He carefully crafted his words to put all the responsibility on Reyna. This was her idea, he seemed to say. If it went wrong, Reyna was to blame. If only Octavian had been the one in charge, things would have been done more sensibly. But alas, he had no choice but to support Reyna, because Octavian was a loyal Roman soldier.

That is such a Roman thing to do. That attitude smacks of Cicero and the Catilinarian Orations, and I absolutely love it. And it’s a great moment for Percy as a character, too, because he realizes/remembers that there are ways to be powerful besides being a swordmaster. And Octavian does it all without any of Piper’s charmspeak. Aghhh, as frustrating a person as Octavian is, he is a wonderfully written character.
Next, ELLA! What an important character. [OK, so I decided my thoughts about her were too important to get stuck under this cut, so I posted them right over here, and would love if you’d read them.]
Other linguistic-y things… We learn that Frank’s family name, Zhang, means “master of bows”. Having recently delved into Mandarin, I was curious about this. According to what I could find, legend does indeed have it that the surname 张 (trad. 張, pinyin Zhāng), whose components mean “bow” and “wide”, was first given to the man who invented said weapon. So, awesome incorporation of that myth!
This also brings me to the myth of the city Li-Jien. When I first heard this, it sounded way too coincidental to be true. A town whose Chinese name sounds like the English derivative of the Latin word for a group of soldiers, where Roman soldiers actually lived? And yet! This myth bears fruit as well. The people in the area of the ancient city Liqian (to use the current Romanization system, pinyin) have some physical characteristics that made others wonder if they had some European ancestry.
This is now generally believed not to be the case, but one historian once suggested that a band of Romans were captured at the Battle of Carrhae, resettled at Liqian, and eventually may have been mercenaries for the ancient Chinese people of that area. So, scientifically probably bogus, but a terrific story, and an excellent play on words! (Ignoring, of course, that the Romans would have pronounced the word legio as LEGG-ee-oh =P)
The slightly-more-frustrating part of Frank’s story is that Riordan moves back and forth aimlessly between Mandarin and Cantonese, using various Romanization systems in no systematic way. In Chapter 10, in a conversation with Frank’s grandmother (bless her), we get gwai poh (to describe a white-skinned goddess), the names Fai and Zhang, and an indication that his family speaks Mandarin, as that is the language in which the goddess addressed them.
Gwai poh (鬼婆, jyutping: gwai2 po4) is a fairly well-known phrase for a white woman, but it is Cantonese. Likewise, “Fai” is not even a viable sound in Mandarin. It is definitely a sound in Cantonese, but I have been unable to find resources for what character it might be as a name. On the other hand, Zhang is definitely Mandarin (would probably be spelled Cheung if it were Cantonese), and then the goddess speaks to them in Mandarin. So… I wish there had been some more consistency there. Anyone who is more knowledgable about these things should feel free to comment.
Finally, after all that, they keep using the Latin word podex to mean “butt”, and there is very little extant use of that word. Culus would have made more sense, as far as I can tell. (Though, admittedly, it doesn’t have the good sounding -ex ending.)
Whew, done. =P

So I have quite a few 2013 books still to post… Here we go! (Spoilers below) 39 / 50 Books in 2013

Woooo, Percy returns! I still like the third-person POV, but I honestly laughed with delight when I realised how consistently Percy’s voice is portrayed even from an external narrator. Well done, Rick Riordan :)

So broad strokes: Hazel and Frank are A++. I want to hug them. I want to hug everybody. Frank’s grandmother is the complete greatest, that is all. I thought Riordan did a fabulous job illustrating the differences between Greek and Roman society, and I deeply appreciated the presence of Italic deities and those with no Greek counterparts. (Terminus the TSA agent. Bless him.)

Mars and his differences from Ares were wonderful, and I’m glad they brought him to the forefront. Interestingly, the supreme power of Mars combined with the Romans’ distrust of Neptune almost makes Frank more powerful than Percy to the Romans, especially once you take into account that he is a descendent of Neptune as well. How very interesting.

I was also fascinated by the explanation of New Rome in the west and the Greeks in the east, especially the bit about the Eastern and Western Roman empires, the Byzantines… I’m just floored by the ways Riordan adapts these concepts. “That’s why,” he explains through Frank in Chapter 9, “whatever country we settle in, Camp Jupiter is always in the west—the Roman part of the territory. The east is considered bad luck.”

Funny things… Dakota and his Kool-Aid were hilarious, though not nearly as much as Iris and the Rainbow Organic Foods & Lifestyles Co-op (full of ROFLcopters). That is how you write to your audience. Also when Mars wrote the prophecy for the quest and silently threatened Octavian with a grenade. That was hilarious and also something Octavian totally deserved.

The Twelfth Legion Fulminata is fantastic all around, and hooray for Fulminata being an accurate adjective there! Other linguistic-y things and more about Octavian and Ella (Ella and Tyson—be still my heart. Cuter than cute.) will follow at the end, under the cut ^_^

Finally, before that, I have forever and eternal emotions about Percy’s desire for a future with Annabeth at New Rome, which ties in beautifully to the last line, which was so touching: “‘Come on,’ he said. ‘Let me introduce you to my other family.’”

Read More

jenesaispourquoi:

i’d been meaning to do this for a while, but bookhobbit and effervescentkettle both tagged me and reminded me, so here are 10 books that have really stuck with me:

  • A Little Princess, by Francis Hodgson Burnet
  • Dragonwings, by Laurence Yep
  • A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, by Betty Smith
  • Jennifer, Hecate, Macbeth, William McKinley, and Me, Elizabeth, by E.L. Konigsburg
  • The Five People You Meet in Heaven, by Mitch Albom
  • The Wings of Merlin, by T.A. Barron
  • Phoenix Rising, by Karen Hesse
  • Annie on My Mind, by Nancy Garden
  • Bel Canto, by Ann Patchett
  • The Realm of Possibility, by David Levithan
thecumberbachelor:

lalondes:

So. Ned Vizzini has committed suicide. And this fact of his death, that it was by his own hand, weighs so, so heavy on the grief that I am feeling right now.
I am not the first young person to write, today, about how It’s Kind of a Funny Story kept me breathing during some of the darkest moments of my adolescence. I will not be the last. This is Ned’s legacy: he tossed a bright, orange-and-white ring to us drowning kids and pleaded with us to stay afloat. And we read his words, and we understood, and we eventually made our way to shore.
I was thirteen years old when I read Funny Story for the first time. I was still living in Vancouver. I picked it up at the Chapters on Broadway and Granville and cautiously paged through the first couple of chapters right there in the store. I put it back on the shelf. The very next week, my family took off on a vacation to the east coast. We stopped into a Barnes & Noble in New York City, and I found a copy and read a few more chapters. It wasn’t until Kramerbooks in Washington, D.C., that I decided, finally, to buy the damn thing and bring it home. I’ve kept it with me ever since.
It’s a special book. I truly don’t believe that a more accurate portrait of a young person’s depression exists in literature, with the exception, maybe, of The Bell Jar. And the great, unspeakable tragedy of The Bell Jar is now the tragedy of Funny Story.
The book opens, as you can see above, with sixteen-year-old protagonist Craig musing that it’s “so hard to talk when you want to kill yourself.” The last page, by contrast, is a cacophony of verbs, spat out in a breathless staccato, ending with a clarion call to “live, live, live, live.” I think I must have read that page alone a hundred times now. It got me through high school. It got me through my parents’ divorce. It got me through the end of friendships. Once, in the tenth grade, it kept me from a suicide attempt.
And there, I think, lies the most important lesson: survival is not a temporary state. Healing does not necessarily have a delineated beginning and end. You have been sad before, and you will be sad again; what matters is how you interact with your sadness. You have to be kind to yourself, and gentle. You have to surround yourself with people who love you, and you have to love them in return. Every day of your life is a fight, and it helps to have allies.
Ned Vizzini was once asked what he hoped young adults would take away from Funny Story, and he said this: 

What I would like young adults to take away from It’s Kind of a Funny Story is that if you’re feeling suicidal, call a hotline. Suicidal ideation really is a medical emergency and if more people knew to call the suicide hotline we’d have less suicides.

In Ned’s memory, I will reiterate his words: if you are feeling suicidal, or depressed, or anxious, talk to someone. Call a hotline. I’ve posted a list of helpful numbers here.
Don’t keep quiet. Ask for help. You are not alone.
Live. Live. Live. Live.
Live.

i still can’t believe he died. jesus.

Books are important. Stories are important. Narratives that accurately depict people’s lives and offer support when there might not be any anywhere else are important. Bless Ned Vizzini for sharing this with us, and may he rest in peace.
May the rest of us live.

thecumberbachelor:

lalondes:

So. Ned Vizzini has committed suicide. And this fact of his death, that it was by his own hand, weighs so, so heavy on the grief that I am feeling right now.

I am not the first young person to write, today, about how It’s Kind of a Funny Story kept me breathing during some of the darkest moments of my adolescence. I will not be the last. This is Ned’s legacy: he tossed a bright, orange-and-white ring to us drowning kids and pleaded with us to stay afloat. And we read his words, and we understood, and we eventually made our way to shore.

I was thirteen years old when I read Funny Story for the first time. I was still living in Vancouver. I picked it up at the Chapters on Broadway and Granville and cautiously paged through the first couple of chapters right there in the store. I put it back on the shelf. The very next week, my family took off on a vacation to the east coast. We stopped into a Barnes & Noble in New York City, and I found a copy and read a few more chapters. It wasn’t until Kramerbooks in Washington, D.C., that I decided, finally, to buy the damn thing and bring it home. I’ve kept it with me ever since.

It’s a special book. I truly don’t believe that a more accurate portrait of a young person’s depression exists in literature, with the exception, maybe, of The Bell Jar. And the great, unspeakable tragedy of The Bell Jar is now the tragedy of Funny Story.

The book opens, as you can see above, with sixteen-year-old protagonist Craig musing that it’s “so hard to talk when you want to kill yourself.” The last page, by contrast, is a cacophony of verbs, spat out in a breathless staccato, ending with a clarion call to “live, live, live, live.” I think I must have read that page alone a hundred times now. It got me through high school. It got me through my parents’ divorce. It got me through the end of friendships. Once, in the tenth grade, it kept me from a suicide attempt.

And there, I think, lies the most important lesson: survival is not a temporary state. Healing does not necessarily have a delineated beginning and end. You have been sad before, and you will be sad again; what matters is how you interact with your sadness. You have to be kind to yourself, and gentle. You have to surround yourself with people who love you, and you have to love them in return. Every day of your life is a fight, and it helps to have allies.

Ned Vizzini was once asked what he hoped young adults would take away from Funny Story, and he said this: 

What I would like young adults to take away from It’s Kind of a Funny Story is that if you’re feeling suicidal, call a hotline. Suicidal ideation really is a medical emergency and if more people knew to call the suicide hotline we’d have less suicides.

In Ned’s memory, I will reiterate his words: if you are feeling suicidal, or depressed, or anxious, talk to someone. Call a hotline. I’ve posted a list of helpful numbers here.

Don’t keep quiet. Ask for help. You are not alone.

Live. Live. Live. Live.

Live.

i still can’t believe he died. jesus.

Books are important. Stories are important. Narratives that accurately depict people’s lives and offer support when there might not be any anywhere else are important. Bless Ned Vizzini for sharing this with us, and may he rest in peace.

May the rest of us live.

(via paradoxsocks)


You’ll be missed, Ned.

You’ll be missed, Ned.

(via paradoxsocks)

OK. I just want to point out that site from which I got the cover photo had it on a list of Top Ten Creepiest Covers for YA fiction.
It was the cover that got me.
It was a bit before Halloween, the artwork was haunting and beautiful, and I was all set for a monster story.
This is not a monster story. At least not in the traditional sense.
I have admired Siobhan Dowd’s work for several years (though I haven’t read all her books yet), and I was excited to read this work she inspired. But as I read I realised that this is not a monster story, not a Halloween story.
This is a nightmare story. This is a story of uncontrollable circumstances of real life, and the fear that comes with them.
It’s wonderfully written (I’m excited to check out Patrick Ness’s other work when I get a chance!) with beautiful illustrations by Jim Kay, and it really does deal with grief and illness and family tension in a great way, one which I think is supportive to older children and young adults who read this book, and even actual adults, too.
The final conversation between Conor and the monster was really touching, but it did feel a bit to me like it was a Very Obvious Presentation Of The Moral. Perhaps that is because I am a bit older than the target audience. Regardless, this story is a fantastic tribute to Dowd’s memory, and I’m glad I read it.
I would also add that it actually put me in tears as I was reading it on the subway, so keep some tissues handy…
38 / 50 Books in 2013

OK. I just want to point out that site from which I got the cover photo had it on a list of Top Ten Creepiest Covers for YA fiction.

It was the cover that got me.

It was a bit before Halloween, the artwork was haunting and beautiful, and I was all set for a monster story.

This is not a monster story. At least not in the traditional sense.

I have admired Siobhan Dowd’s work for several years (though I haven’t read all her books yet), and I was excited to read this work she inspired. But as I read I realised that this is not a monster story, not a Halloween story.

This is a nightmare story. This is a story of uncontrollable circumstances of real life, and the fear that comes with them.

It’s wonderfully written (I’m excited to check out Patrick Ness’s other work when I get a chance!) with beautiful illustrations by Jim Kay, and it really does deal with grief and illness and family tension in a great way, one which I think is supportive to older children and young adults who read this book, and even actual adults, too.

The final conversation between Conor and the monster was really touching, but it did feel a bit to me like it was a Very Obvious Presentation Of The Moral. Perhaps that is because I am a bit older than the target audience. Regardless, this story is a fantastic tribute to Dowd’s memory, and I’m glad I read it.

I would also add that it actually put me in tears as I was reading it on the subway, so keep some tissues handy…

38 / 50 Books in 2013

I’ve finally made it to the second series! As I’ve been saying, these books get better and better. It’s so much fun to watch Riordan evolve as a writer. I love the multiple POVs and third-person narration in this book, and the writing seems to flow more smoothly. I was also very pleased with the way various plot lines interacted and tied up. I was genuinely surprised by the ending, which is always a really pleasant feeling! (Well, unless the surprise is terrible, but this wasn’t ^_^)
I’ve also continued in audiobooks, and this series has a new narrator. Overall, I like his phrasing better than the narrator from series 1, but his French accent was pretty bad, and some of his anglicized Greek names threw me =P
Jason, Piper, and Leo are really fun characters. Leo and Piper both have their superpowers, but they aren’t children of the Big Three or full of ~heroic drama~ the way that Percy and Jason tend to be, so it’s really enjoyable to see things from their perspective. For all three of them, it’s nice to see what life as a demigod child is like for kids whose parents aren’t quite as present or supportive as Sally Jackson.
Hmm, this turned into probably the longest review I’ve ever written, so more detailed discussion and spoilers below!
37 / 50 Books in 2013
[[MORE]]
One thing I was initially very curious about was how Riordan is going to handle Piper’s family background. So far in the first series and with Jason and Leo, no one has been from a terribly religious background, so there hasn’t been a need to explain why the Greek gods exist but others don’t.
But, Piper and her dad talk about Cherokee myths, about things her grandpa believed, and they talk about how they think the Greeks and the Cherokee were/are equally wrong: the stars are not Hercules or hedgehogs, but just burning balls of gas. I want rationalization for this, for why the Greeks are “right” and the Cherokee are not.
I am hopeful that we’ll get that. When they rescued Piper’s dad, he said,

They were monsters. Real monsters. Earth spirits, right out of Grandpa Tom’s stories—and the Earth Mother was angry with me. And the giant, Tsul’kälû, breathing fire— They said you were a demigod. Your mother was…

and Piper fills in “Aphrodite”. I love love love that Tristan McClain saw and interpreted everything through the lens of Cherokee myths, and I really, really hope that when he and Piper sit down for the “guess what, I’m a demigod” conversation again, they expand on this, and someone somehow explains it.
It would have been nice if there could have been a Cherokee name for Aphrodite provided, but, I fully admit, I know nothing about Cherokee myth and tradition, and maybe that wasn’t quite possible. I hope that there will also be further exploration of Piper and Tristan’s whole relationship, and potentially why Tristan buried his past so much.
I liked that they included bits of Spanish (accurate as far as I could tell) in Leo’s sections, though mostly it was his mom calling him mijo (Riordan has a Thing about calling people “my dear”, it seems) and then Hera as his Tía Callida. That’s an interesting name for her, as Callida is an actual name, derived from the Latin adjective for “warm” or “hot”, and Leo with fire… very interesting.
The French in the Quebec scene seemed really good, though the Piper-speaks-French-because-language-of-love thing was kind of trite. Cute, so I’ll let it go, but trite.
The Latin on the other hand… I am disappoint. I don’t recall as much direct use of Greek in the first series. There were phrases like ball’ eis korakas and stuff, but in this book there was some serious Latin, and I question most of its accuracy. (Which is disappointing, given how well done the French was. Who checked the Latin in this book?? It’s not like there aren’t plenty of classicists who would be able to look it over…?)
I liked that Piper, Leo, and Jason each got an opportunity to save the day while the other two were somehow incapacitated. That was well-constructed. Also Coach Hedge would be BFFs with Strax from Doctor Who.
Finally, I’m curious how timezones affect deadlines for quests? Noon in California is not the same as noon in New York, which is definitely different from noon in Greece, where they seem to be headed next. So then what?
Off to start book 2 now! I’m excited!

I’ve finally made it to the second series! As I’ve been saying, these books get better and better. It’s so much fun to watch Riordan evolve as a writer. I love the multiple POVs and third-person narration in this book, and the writing seems to flow more smoothly. I was also very pleased with the way various plot lines interacted and tied up. I was genuinely surprised by the ending, which is always a really pleasant feeling! (Well, unless the surprise is terrible, but this wasn’t ^_^)

I’ve also continued in audiobooks, and this series has a new narrator. Overall, I like his phrasing better than the narrator from series 1, but his French accent was pretty bad, and some of his anglicized Greek names threw me =P

Jason, Piper, and Leo are really fun characters. Leo and Piper both have their superpowers, but they aren’t children of the Big Three or full of ~heroic drama~ the way that Percy and Jason tend to be, so it’s really enjoyable to see things from their perspective. For all three of them, it’s nice to see what life as a demigod child is like for kids whose parents aren’t quite as present or supportive as Sally Jackson.

Hmm, this turned into probably the longest review I’ve ever written, so more detailed discussion and spoilers below!

37 / 50 Books in 2013

Read More

This is the first one of my (re?)read that I really didn’t remember. Maybe I never actually read it…
The foreshadowing was really well done (with Rachel in particular), and the Iliad parallels stunned me. (It helps that at the time I read this, I was reading the Iliad for class as well.)
[Spoilers below]
In particular, I loved Silena pulling a Patroklos and going to lead that attack, and I love that that intentional parallel supports the Clarisse/Silena shippy vibe I sort of got. I wish that could be more explored. Maybe he’ll write some short stories from one of their points of view and touch on their relationship. Romance or not (because they do both have other relationships), their friendship is fascinating, given their personalities, and I want more of it!
[End spoilers]
I also liked the explanation for how the Curse of Achilles worked, and the ending was really, really well done. I came out of it in some kind of astounded mix of intense feelings about Annabeth herself and her relationship with Percy. And Percy’s deliberation about his reward… yes, good.
I’m so excited to get into the Heroes of Olympus now!
36 / 50 Books in 2013

This is the first one of my (re?)read that I really didn’t remember. Maybe I never actually read it…

The foreshadowing was really well done (with Rachel in particular), and the Iliad parallels stunned me. (It helps that at the time I read this, I was reading the Iliad for class as well.)

[Spoilers below]

In particular, I loved Silena pulling a Patroklos and going to lead that attack, and I love that that intentional parallel supports the Clarisse/Silena shippy vibe I sort of got. I wish that could be more explored. Maybe he’ll write some short stories from one of their points of view and touch on their relationship. Romance or not (because they do both have other relationships), their friendship is fascinating, given their personalities, and I want more of it!

[End spoilers]

I also liked the explanation for how the Curse of Achilles worked, and the ending was really, really well done. I came out of it in some kind of astounded mix of intense feelings about Annabeth herself and her relationship with Percy. And Percy’s deliberation about his reward… yes, good.

I’m so excited to get into the Heroes of Olympus now!

36 / 50 Books in 2013

Rachel Elizabeth Daaaaaare :)
I took too long to post this since I finished it, so I don’t remember what else to say /o\
35 / 50 Books in 2013 (reread)

Rachel Elizabeth Daaaaaare :)

I took too long to post this since I finished it, so I don’t remember what else to say /o\

35 / 50 Books in 2013 (reread)

Cross out what you’ve already read. Six is the average

Pride and Prejudice - Jane Austen
The Lord of the Rings - JRR Tolkien
Jane Eyre - Charlotte Bronte
Harry Potter series - JK Rowling 
To Kill a Mockingbird - Harper Lee 
[The Bible] (have read some)
Wuthering Heights - Emily Bronte
Nineteen Eighty Four - George Orwell
His Dark Materials - Philip Pullman
Great Expectations - Charles Dickens
Little Women - Louisa M Alcott
Tess of the D’Urbervilles - Thomas Hardy
Catch 22 - Joseph Heller
Rebecca - Daphne Du Maurier
The Hobbit - JRR Tolkien
Birdsong - Sebastian Faulk
Catcher in the Rye - JD Salinger
The Time Traveller’s Wife - Audrey Niffenegger
Middlemarch - George Eliot
Gone With The Wind - Margaret Mitchell
The Great Gatsby - F Scott Fitzgerald
Bleak House - Charles Dickens
War and Peace - Leo Tolstoy
The Hitch Hiker’s Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams
Brideshead Revisited - Evelyn Waugh
Crime and Punishment - Fyodor Dostoyevsky
Grapes of Wrath - John Steinbeck 
Alice in Wonderland - Lewis Carroll
The Wind in the Willows - Kenneth Grahame
Anna Karenina - Leo Tolstoy
David Copperfield - Charles Dickens
[Chronicles of Narnia - CS Lewis] (the first 2-3)
Emma - Jane Austen
Persuasion - Jane Austen
The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe - CS Lewis
The Kite Runner - Khaled Hosseini
Captain Corelli’s Mandolin - Louis De Bernieres
Memoirs of a Geisha - Arthur Golden
Winnie the Pooh - AA Milne
Animal Farm - George Orwell
The Da Vinci Code - Dan Brown
One Hundred Years of Solitude - Gabriel Garcia Marquez
A Prayer for Owen Meaney - John Irving
The Woman in White - Wilkie Collins
Anne of Green Gables - LM Montgomery
Far From The Madding Crowd - Thomas Hardy
The Handmaid’s Tale - Margaret Atwood
Lord of the Flies - William Golding
Atonement - Ian McEwan
Life of Pi - Yann Martel
Dune - Frank Herbert 
Cold Comfort Farm - Stella Gibbons
Sense and Sensibility - Jane Austen
A Suitable Boy - Vikram Seth
The Shadow of the Wind - Carlos Ruiz Zafon
A Tale Of Two Cities - Charles Dickens
[Brave New World - Aldous Huxley] (i tried)
The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time - Mark Haddon
Love In The Time Of Cholera - Gabriel Garcia Marquez
Of Mice and Men - John Steinbeck 
Lolita - Vladimir Nabokov
The Secret History - Donna Tartt
The Lovely Bones - Alice Sebold
Count of Monte Cristo - Alexandre Dumas
On The Road - Jack Kerouac
Jude the Obscure - Thomas Hardy
Bridget Jones’s Diary - Helen Fielding
Midnight’s Children - Salman Rushdie
Moby Dick - Herman Melville
Oliver Twist - Charles Dickens
Dracula - Bram Stoker
The Secret Garden - Frances Hodgson Burnett
Notes From A Small Island - Bill Bryson
Ulysses - James Joyce
The Bell Jar - Sylvia Plath
Swallows and Amazons - Arthur Ransome
Germinal - Emile Zola
Vanity Fair - William Makepeace Thackeray
Possession - AS Byatt
A Christmas Carol - Charles Dickens
Cloud Atlas - David Mitchell
The Color Purple - Alice Walker
The Remains of the Day - Kazuo Ishiguro
Madame Bovary - Gustave Flaubert
A Fine Balance - Rohinton Mistry
Charlotte’s Web - EB White 
The Five People You Meet In Heaven - Mitch Albom
Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
The Faraway Tree Collection - Enid Blyton
Heart of Darkness - Joseph Conrad
The Little Prince - Antoine De Saint-Exupery
The Wasp Factory - Iain Banks
Watership Down - Richard Adams 
A Confederacy of Dunces - John Kennedy Toole
A Town Like Alice - Nevil Shute
The Three Musketeers - Alexandre Dumas
Hamlet - William Shakespeare
Charlie and the Chocolate Factory - Roald Dahl
Les Miserables - Victor Hugo

25, assuming I can count. A few incompletes, and a side-eye at including Narnia as a whole and also The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe.

(via riddlerose)

They do get better and better. This one covered some important things about family, and Tantalus was pretty funny.
34 / 50 Books in 2013 (reread)

They do get better and better. This one covered some important things about family, and Tantalus was pretty funny.

34 / 50 Books in 2013 (reread)

Ahhhh I’d forgotten about Tyson! As I thought, the writing did get better in this book.
33 / 50 Books in 2013 (reread)

Ahhhh I’d forgotten about Tyson! As I thought, the writing did get better in this book.

33 / 50 Books in 2013 (reread)

(via books-to-the-ceiling)

Read this because it was there and I thought it would be fun. Accidentally spoiled myself for some stuff later on that, if I’d ever known, I’d forgotten. Whoops, haha!
32 / 50 Books in 2013

Read this because it was there and I thought it would be fun. Accidentally spoiled myself for some stuff later on that, if I’d ever known, I’d forgotten. Whoops, haha!

32 / 50 Books in 2013